.
Tpack-contexts-small.jpg
Tpack-contexts-small.jpg

‍Introduction:

At several of our previous meetings we have used a "Prensky Scale" to examine lessons/projects.
  • Dabbling.
  • Doing old things in old ways
    • When a new technology appears, our first instinct is always to continue doing things within the technology the way we've always done it.
      That is almost exclusively what we now do with educational technology. We use it mostly to pass documents around, but now in electronic form, and the result is not very different from what we have always known.

    • .People certainly are putting courses, curricula, and lesson plans online. This trend is important, but it's hardly new -- it will be new only when those courses, curricula, and lesson plans are very different and technology influenced, when they are set up so they can be found and mixed and matched easily, when they are continually iterated and updated, and when the kids have a big say in their creation.
    • . Certainly, systems for maintaining records and assessment online, such as PowerSchool, a Web-based student-information system from Pearson School Systems have emerged, but the records and assessments we ask for and keep, for the most part, haven't changed.
    • I would even include writing, creating, submitting, and sharing work digitally on the computer via email or instant messaging in the category of doing old things (communicating and exchanging) in old ways (passing stuff around). Is there educational progress, though? It appears that students who write on a computer turn in longer and higher-quality assignments than those who compose by hand, even though it's still writing
  • Doing old things in new ways.
    • But there are many more old things children are doing in new ways -- innovations they have invented or adopted as their preferred method of behavior -- that have not yet made their way into our schools.
      • These include buying school materials (clothes, supplies, and even homework) on eBay and the Internet;
      • exchanging music on P2P sites; building games with modding (modifying) tools;
      • setting up meetings and dates online; posting personal information and creations for others to check out;
      • meeting people through cell phones; building libraries of music and movies;
      • working together in self-formed teams in multiplayer online role-playing games;
      • creating and using online reputation systems; peer rating of comments; online gaming; screen saver analysis; photoblogging; programming; exploring; and even transgressing and testing social norms.
    • An important question is, How many of these new ways will ever be integrated into our instruction -- or even understood by educators? If we want to move the useful adoption of technology forward, it is crucial for educators to learn to listen, to observe, to ask, and to try all the new methods their students have already figured out, and do so regularly.
  • Doing new things in new ways.
    • What we're talking about is invention -- new things in new ways.
    • Change is the order of the day in our kids' 21st-century lives. It ought to be the order of the day in their schools as well. Not only would students welcome it, they will soon demand it.
    • So, let's not just adopt technology into our schools. Let's adapt it, push it, pull it, iterate with it, experiment with it, test it, and redo it, until we reach the point where we and our kids truly feel we've done our very best. Then, let's push it and pull it some more. And let's do it quickly, so the 22nd century doesn't catch us by surprise with too much of our work undone.

It's time to kick that up a notch with the TPaCK framework which helps educators label the knowledge a teacher needs to teach. Though the three knowledge bases of Technological Knowledge, Pedagogical Knowledge, and Content Knowledge are easy for teachers to grasp, the interplay of them is often subtle and distinctions can be hard to see at first.

This WebQuest is designed to first familiarize you with the TPaCK framework, then to examine and discuss examples that combine the three bases to different degrees and success.
Web Quest YouTube Video

What is a WebQuest?


A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which most or all the information that learners work with comes from the web. The model was developed by Bernie Dodge at San Diego State University

‍The Task:

To understand and define TPaCK for yourself and your group you need to wrestle with existing definitions and real life examples. By the end of this WebQuest, you and your group will answer these questions:
  1. Which two lessons/projects listed below best blend thoughtful knowledge of technology, pedagogy, and content? Why?
  2. Which two blend the least thoughtfully? Why?
  3. What do best and worst mean to you according to your role?

‍The Process:

Step 1) First, you'll need a refresher on how Mishra, Koehler, and Harris define TPaCK. You'll view parts of two videos below as a whole group.

‍TPaCK Video Extension:

Teachers who have seen the TPaCK videos (2 of them) will do this activity in lieu of watching with the whole group. This will be approximately a 20-30 minute independent activity for this group of teachers.
  • http://punya.educ.msu.edu/2009/04/08/guest-blogging-for-nashworld-tpack-video/ Please watch the two videos and read the post replies. Then leave your thinking on the Nashworld Blog site in the comment section at the bottom of the page.
  • Click on the link below and read Punya's thinking about the mash-up video that was made. Feel free to leave a comment after you have read his blog post and some of the comments that are posted. The comment section is at the bottom of the page.
  • http://nashworld.edublogs.org/2009/04/08/a-tpack-video-mashup/
  • The ultimate challenge (time permitting) is to create a new mash-up video featuring the attributes of TPaCK from your perspective. You will rejoin the group for the remaining activities in approximately 20-30 minutes.

Step 2) Next, you'll be assigned a group of three. Each member of the group will be assigned one of three perspectives from which to examine the lessons/projects below. The three perspectives are:
T.gif
T.gif
The Technology Expert
(think David Pogue )
P.gif
P.gif
Pedagogy Expert
(think John Dewey )
C.gif
C.gif
Content Expert
(think The Professor)
300pix.gif
300pix.gif

You love the Tools. The newer, the shinier, the more powerful the better. To you, the best lessons/projects make the best use of the technology available to the kids and meet ISTE's standards . If the lesson/project makes minimal use of the tools, you'd rather use a more traditional assignment. Your mantra is "new things new ways ", but make sure it is integral, not an add-on.
300pix.gif
300pix.gif

You love variety in your methods. To you, the best lessons/projects have elements that are: hands-on, experiential, project-based,(project-based learning pdf) differentiated, address the multiple intelligences, etc.
You take to heart Comenius' quote, "Let the main object of this, our Didactic, be as follows : To seek and to find a method of instruction by which teachers may teach less, but learners may learn more ..."
300pix.gif
300pix.gif

You love your content. To you, the best lessons/projects meet your state standards (GLCE's), are rigorous, cover all of Bloom's taxonomy, and assess students' comprehension thoroughly. You want your students to appreciate your content area as much as you do.
Step 3) Next you will regroup with the other team members who represent the perspective you have been assigned. As a group, you'll examine each of the lessons/projects below and use the to jot down some notes of your opinions of each from your perspective (try not to let your everyday perspective cloud your judgement). You'll need to examine each site fairly quickly. Don't spend more than 7 minutes on any one site.

A facilitator will keep time using this clock:

Online Stopwatch
Here are the lessons/projects you'll be analyzing: Be sure to click all of the links associated with each lesson/project.

1. http://ignite.wikis.birmingham.k12.mi.us/Pecha+Kucha
2.How Effective were the Efforts of the Freedmen’s Bureau?
4.Traveling the Road to Freedom Through Research and Historical Fiction
Traveling the Road to Freedom Webquest This is the link to the Road to Freedom Webquest for the above lesson.
5.Copyright Infringement or Not? The Debate over Downloading Music
6.Amazing Race: U.S. Regions
7. The Not-So-Great Society


Step 4) When the perspective groups have examined all the lessons/projects, it's time to get together with your Jigsaw group to answer the questions.
  1. Which two lessons/projects listed below best blend thoughtful knowledge of technology, pedagogy, and content? Why?
  2. Which two blend the least thoughtfully? Why?
  3. What do best and worst mean to you as a TPaCK unit?

One way to proceed would be to go around and poll each team member for the best two and worst two from their perspective. Pay attention to each of the other perspectives, even if at first you think you might disagree with them. Use the [[image:ignite/Tpack-contexts-small.jpg|TPaCK diagram]] to determine where these lessons fall.
There will probably not be unanimous agreement, so the next step is to talk together to hammer out a compromise consensus about your team's nominations for best and worst. Pool your perspectives and see if you can agree on what's best for the learner. DO NOT JUST TALLY UP THE VOTES AND DECLARE A WINNER. Instead, begin to put aside your individual perspective and come to an agreement that takes into account all three perspectives.
One person in each group should record the group's thoughts.
When debriefing time is called, report your results to the whole group. Do you think the other groups will agree with your conclusions?

Conclusion

  • Discuss your understanding of the TPaCK model with the cohort.

‍Application

As a group of three (technology expert, pedagogy expert, content expert) , pick one of activities from the cohort, consider it from all three perspectives. What could you modify to help this lesson/project hit the sweet spot in the TPaCK venn diagram. Go up to the discussion tab and click on the lesson/project and add your thoughts. If a threaded discussion has already started, just hit the reply button.

1. http://ignite.wikis.birmingham.k12.mi.us/Pecha+Kucha
2.How Effective were the Efforts of the Freedmen’s Bureau?
4.Traveling the Road to Freedom Through Research and Historical Fiction
Traveling the Road to Freedom Webquest This is the link to the Road to Freedom Webquest for the above lesson.
5.Copyright Infringement or Not? The Debate over Downloading Music
6.Amazing Race: U.S. Regions
7. The Not-So-Great Society




Modified from: http://webquest.sdsu.edu/webquestwebquest-es.html
TPaCK Graphic: http://www.tpack.org/